Proofreading on the Fly...

Mother Nature's Nursery Rhymes, a children's poetry book, was done. Bill Sheehan was hand-carrying the art to his printer in Hong Kong. During the long flight, he noticed that bees and their activity were mentioned in a poem on page 15, but there were no bees in the accompanying illustration. Upon landing, he called Itoko Maeno, the illustrator, back at Advocacy Press in Santa Barbara. She suggested copying a bee from a previous page, and that saved the day.

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Book Publishing Tips of the Day

Daily words of wisdom from Dan Poynter and other publishing industry experts. (Search on "tip" in archives for complete list.) - Today's Tip from Poynter: "Hire a Proofreader."
PUBLISHING TIP OF THE DAY

"Hire a Proofreader."

The more eyes, the better.

Do not try to proof your own work. You are too close to the manuscript and will miss some typographical errors. You need a professional with fresh eyes to proofread your work.

Your computer's spelling and grammar checkers are good for a first pass, but never rely on them exclusively.

Make sure your proofreader uses standard proofreading marks so the corrections will be clear to all. For a chart of proofreader's marks, see your dictionary.

There is more to proofing than just punctuation and spelling. And, it is never too late to proofread-again.

Do not skimp on proofreading. It is far more expensive to take ink off paper than to put it on.

"When you publish a book, it's the world's book. The world edits it." -Philip Roth, New York Times Book Review.

(c) 2000 by Dan Poynter. For more tips and information on book writing, publishing and promoting, see the Para Publishing Web site.

MARKETING TIP OF THE DAY

When making cold-calls to the media, think of the person on the other end of the line as a friend and a person, not a machine working for your agenda.

(c) 2000 by Tami DePalma. For more tips and information about "Marketing with a Twist," visit the MarketAbility Web site. Don't your books deserve MAXIMUM EXPOSURE?


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